ninjatengu:

mddiaries:

aspiringdoctors:

thisfuturemd:

Common Abbreviations in Medicine

YAY THIS IS GREAT! Also…- PRN= as needed
- BID = twice a day
- TID = three times a day
-hx or h/o = history of
- dc or d/c = discharge
- fu or f/u = follow-up
- CC = chief complaint or coco chanel ;)
Any others?

BIBEMS= brought in by EMSBIBA= brought in by ambulanceNTND= non-tender, non-distended TTP=tender to palpation RUQ, LUQ, RLQ, LLQ= right upper, left upper, right lower, left lower quadrant SOB=shortness of breath CP=chest painD/w= discussed withHTN=hypertension HLD=hyperlipidemiaT2DM= type 2 diabetes mellitusqH=every evening 2/2=secondary toAFVSS= afebrile, vital signs stableNS=normal saline

BRBPR: Bright red blood per rectum LAD: Lymphadenopathy CAD: coronary artery diseasePNA: Pneumonia BS: Bowel (or breath) sounds (as in Bowel sounds +) N/V: Nausea/vomiting AAO: Awake, alert, oriented A+O: Awake and orientedAKA: Above knee amputationBKA: Below knee amputation LMP: Last menstrual period KUB: kidney ureter bladderRRR: Regular rate & rhythm r/m/g: rales, murmurs, gallops (as in “no r/m/g”)also, I’ve seen tx used as transplant as well…

ninjatengu:

mddiaries:

aspiringdoctors:

thisfuturemd:

Common Abbreviations in Medicine

YAY THIS IS GREAT! Also…
- PRN= as needed

- BID = twice a day

- TID = three times a day

-hx or h/o = history of

- dc or d/c = discharge

- fu or f/u = follow-up

- CC = chief complaint or coco chanel ;)

Any others?

BIBEMS= brought in by EMS
BIBA= brought in by ambulance
NTND= non-tender, non-distended
TTP=tender to palpation
RUQ, LUQ, RLQ, LLQ= right upper, left upper, right lower, left lower quadrant
SOB=shortness of breath
CP=chest pain
D/w= discussed with
HTN=hypertension
HLD=hyperlipidemia
T2DM= type 2 diabetes mellitus
qH=every evening
2/2=secondary to
AFVSS= afebrile, vital signs stable
NS=normal saline

BRBPR: Bright red blood per rectum 
LAD: Lymphadenopathy 
CAD: coronary artery disease
PNA: Pneumonia 
BS: Bowel (or breath) sounds (as in Bowel sounds +) 
N/V: Nausea/vomiting 
AAO: Awake, alert, oriented 
A+O: Awake and oriented
AKA: Above knee amputation
BKA: Below knee amputation 
LMP: Last menstrual period 
KUB: kidney ureter bladder
RRR: Regular rate & rhythm 
r/m/g: rales, murmurs, gallops (as in “no r/m/g”)
also, I’ve seen tx used as transplant as well…


(via medicalexamination)

medblrreblogs:

CXR interpretation: basics + ABCDEF 
Basics (administration) 
Patient details: name, date of birth, date of exam, indication for CXR
AP or PA + side marker (L or R)
Body position/rotation (clavicle alignment): if the distance between the medial border of each clavicle and the adjacent spinous process are equal, there is no rotation present
Exposure: look at vertebral column behind the heart – should be able to see spine and pulmonary vessels if exposure is correct. If only the spine is visible, the film is over-exposed, if the spine is not visible the film is underexposed.
Inspiration: diaphragm should be intersected by the 5th-75h anterior ribs (e.g. hyperexpansion may be due to emphysema
Films for comparison
 ABCDEF
Airway: trachea should be midline (look for deviation or stenosis, presence of foreign bodies) —> trachea pulled TOWARD disease (atelectasis, agenesis of lung, pneumonectomy, pleural fibrosis) or trachea pushed AWAY from disease (pneumothorax, pleural effusion, large mass)
Bones and soft tissues (including breast shadows): scan the film for broken ribs/clavicles/other, abnormal single bones, metastatic deposits, air pockets in the tissue, breast shadows and lumps, lesions —> if a patient has very thick soft tissue due to obesity, underlying structures such as the lung markings may be obscured; large breasts may obscure the costophrenic angles, giving the impression of the presence of pleural effusions
Cardiac structures: cardiac silhouette (distinct contour should be evident), cardiothoracic ratio (<50% in adult, <66% in neonate; any larger is cardiomegaly), RA, SVC, aortic arch, pulmonary trunk, LA, LV, width of mediastinum
Diaphragm (above and below): dome shape and well defined, R higher than L, costophrenic angles (should be acute and sharp to a point; costophrenic blunting may indicate pleural effusion, hyperexpansion, etc), gastric bubble visible, gastric intrusions (e.g. hiatus hernia), free air under the diaphragm (pneumoperitoneum)
Extras: nasogastric tube, pacemakers, etc
F for lung fields: hila (left hilum should be higher, look for adenopathy of hila, nodes and masses, calcified lymph nodes possibly due to old TB infection), lung markings present, lung edges (markings should go all the way to the end, should not be able to see visceral pleura), pulmonary vessels and vascularity, thickening and calcification of the pleura (only visible when abnormal), nodules, bronchial cuffing, pleural effusions + consider whether any lung zones are………too white (collapse, pleural effusion, consolidation, pulmonary oedema), too dark (pneumothorax, COPD), has too many lines (fibrotic lung disease), if there is a bilateral hilar enlargement (TB, sarcoidosis, lymphoma), asymmetry between R and L zones —> ompare area of abnormality with the rest of the lung field

medblrreblogs:

CXR interpretation: basics + ABCDEF

Basics (administration) 

  • Patient details: name, date of birth, date of exam, indication for CXR
  • AP or PA + side marker (L or R)
  • Body position/rotation (clavicle alignment): if the distance between the medial border of each clavicle and the adjacent spinous process are equal, there is no rotation present
  • Exposure: look at vertebral column behind the heart – should be able to see spine and pulmonary vessels if exposure is correct. If only the spine is visible, the film is over-exposed, if the spine is not visible the film is underexposed.
  • Inspiration: diaphragm should be intersected by the 5th-75h anterior ribs (e.g. hyperexpansion may be due to emphysema
  • Films for comparison

 ABCDEF

  • Airway: trachea should be midline (look for deviation or stenosis, presence of foreign bodies) —> trachea pulled TOWARD disease (atelectasis, agenesis of lung, pneumonectomy, pleural fibrosis) or trachea pushed AWAY from disease (pneumothorax, pleural effusion, large mass)
  • Bones and soft tissues (including breast shadows): scan the film for broken ribs/clavicles/other, abnormal single bones, metastatic deposits, air pockets in the tissue, breast shadows and lumps, lesions —> if a patient has very thick soft tissue due to obesity, underlying structures such as the lung markings may be obscured; large breasts may obscure the costophrenic angles, giving the impression of the presence of pleural effusions
  • Cardiac structures: cardiac silhouette (distinct contour should be evident), cardiothoracic ratio (<50% in adult, <66% in neonate; any larger is cardiomegaly), RA, SVC, aortic arch, pulmonary trunk, LA, LV, width of mediastinum
  • Diaphragm (above and below): dome shape and well defined, R higher than L, costophrenic angles (should be acute and sharp to a point; costophrenic blunting may indicate pleural effusion, hyperexpansion, etc), gastric bubble visible, gastric intrusions (e.g. hiatus hernia), free air under the diaphragm (pneumoperitoneum)
  • Extras: nasogastric tube, pacemakers, etc
  • F for lung fields: hila (left hilum should be higher, look for adenopathy of hila, nodes and masses, calcified lymph nodes possibly due to old TB infection), lung markings present, lung edges (markings should go all the way to the end, should not be able to see visceral pleura), pulmonary vessels and vascularity, thickening and calcification of the pleura (only visible when abnormal), nodules, bronchial cuffing, pleural effusions + consider whether any lung zones are………too white (collapse, pleural effusion, consolidation, pulmonary oedema), too dark (pneumothorax, COPD), has too many lines (fibrotic lung disease), if there is a bilateral hilar enlargement (TB, sarcoidosis, lymphoma), asymmetry between R and L zones —> ompare area of abnormality with the rest of the lung field